General Jimmy

Writer / DJ / PR Manager / Fat Bastard

Hall & Oates – Five for the Funk

Curve-ball to an extent for this week’s Five for the Funk – here’s five reasons why Hall & Oates are awesome in line with my two DJ gigs this weekend at Salt Dog Slims/Bar 81. Lambasted by the rock press at the time and still to this day as bastions of anti-cool and devoid of any traces of credibility, the duo had a handful of master-class records that more than made up for them not being the type of group you’d listen to their albums on repeat. And their tunes tear the roof off week in week out.

Feel the force of their song-writing genius without the need to lodge your tongue in your cheek with the below. And I don’t even have to mention the greatest fancy dress costume ever.


‘Kiss on my List’

A genuine gem of a record, lashings of cheesy vibes permeating every second but really it’s a great radio love song. One of the records that makes the duo really easy to lambast but when you think about it, also one of the reasons they’re also so endearing.


‘Rich Girl’

Prior to their 80s electro-funk reinvention, H&O didn’t really know where they stood in the pop landscape and consequently their efforts were quite far reaching and extremely hit and miss. One of the better jams from the seventies was this rocky ode to girls taking advantage of monetary assistance. Common themes in their records the dastardly ways of women.


‘Maneater’

Arguably the most recognisable and certainly the most commercially successful H&O record and all the better for the languid saxophone that kicks in, as worthy an addition to the 80s pop’s use of that instrument as George Michael’s ‘Careless Whisper’. It’s also warning the male sex about the predatory instincts of women; I was shit scared as a seven year old about actual women eating me as a consequence of this song. The truth, as Darryl and John opined, was much worse.


‘I Can’t Go for That (No Can Do)’

Obvious but what a monster. Prince Paul lopped the groove to perfection on De la’s ‘Say No Go’ and whilst the use was celebrated by many as a victory for post-modernism and evidence of the producer’s wry irony, he contradicted this viewpoint in interviews – his reaction was really that he just liked the sound of it; evidence that the record was built with the dancefloor in mind and where it belongs. Also sampled by the likes of 2 Live Crew, Tech9ne, Heavy D and, er, Simply Red. Pop perfection.


‘You Make my Dreams’

Another record that everyone knows but for all the right reasons. This is as upbeat as it gets and the biggest H&O anthem, hands down. An unashamed floorfiller that is that right combination of being both a bit shit and awesome, which is Hall & Oates massive trademark.

Happy Friday everyone! I’ll be DJing at Salt Dogs from 10pm-3am tonight and tomorrow evening.

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