General Jimmy

Writer / DJ / PR Manager / Fat Bastard

Archive for the month “April, 2013”

Nas ~ Pre-Illmatic Demo {FULL ALBUM}

This is DOPE. Illmatic is certified hip-hop royalty, arguably the finest album the genre has ever created, and this is a full length demo version of outtakes and tracks not used. It’s heavier on guest verses, with QB thoroughbreds Cormega, Screwball and of course AZ, with old school heads MC Serch, Kool G Rap and Biz Markie spitting too. It’s bloody great.

There’s a lot of repetition lyrically of what Illmatic’s lyrics would become, Back to The Grill flips a lot of the lines used in Represent and Nas will Prevail would go onto become ‘IOt aint hard to tell’ (and might have been better keeping this more subtle nod to MJ). But listening to this you can imagine this would still have seen Nas elevated to the upper echelons of rap had this appeared in the stead of Ilmatic.

Vocabulary spills he’s ill.

1. Understanding 0:00
Featuring AZ & Biz Markie
2. Life Is Like A Dice Game 3:12
3. Just Another Day In The Projects 5:51
4. Déjà Vu 9:04
Produced by Chris Winston
5. Back To The Grill 12:51
Featuring MC Serch feat. Chubb Rock & Red Hot Lover Tone
Produced by T-Ray
6. Everything Is Real 17:53
Featuring Shapelle
7. I’m A Villain 20:09
Produced by Large Professor
8. Number One With A Bullet 24:31
Featuring Kool G. Rap & Whiteboy
9. Nas Will Prevail (It Ain’t Hard To Tell Original) 28:47
Produced by Large Professor
10. On The Real (Original) 33:45
Featuring Akinyele, Screwball, & Cormega
11. Live At The BBQ 37:13
Featuring Fatal & Akinyele

Samu.l ‘Restless Dreams’ – review on Pulse

samu.l_restless_dreams

“The original is built round a dreamy vocal sample of a gloriously famous pop duo, set atop a blissed out backing that gives it that haunting jack which is oh so on the money right now.”

Review of the brand new Samu.l track which kicked off Selador Records.

Daft Punk – Get Lucky

I’m going to round up everything to do with the album event of the past five years in good time but until then the final rqadio edit of this amazing record is now out.

Thomas. Guy Manuel. Nile. Pharrell. Awesome.

Five for the Funk – Guru

It’s a sad week for Boston. Whilst the city is reeling in shock from the marathon bombings it’s also the anniversary of one of their strongest musical exponents death this week, and more precisely today. Three years ago rapper Guru, one half of legendary group Gang Starr, died.

The aftermath was a lot of guff dissing his Gang Starr comrade Preemo via the cryptic will cum chain letter administered by DJ Solar, and whilst the truth around that was murky at best one thing that wasn’t was the fact the duo made some serious music. They maybe aren’t the most influential or finest hip-hop group ever, but surely the most consistent, with every studio album rammed full of classic joints.

As well as that Keith Elam pioneered jazz focused hip-hop even more with his Jazzmatazz projects, as well as the occasional guest verse proving his clout over and over again. It’s only right that the monotone master gets some five for the funk love. Roll up…

‘Full Clip’

This was the first song that really got me into Gang Starr. They were on my radar as a teenager but this video was a permanent fixture on MTV Base in 1999 when sciving school was a necessity so I could stay up all night watching hip-hop videos. The cameos in the video, the shout out to Big L (again someone who I was just abotu to discover properly), and Guru

I copped the album shortly afterwards as well and realised the full scope of the group’s longevity and ability. I’ve been head-nodding to them ever since.

‘DWTYCK’ ft Nice & smooth

Lemonade is a popular drink and it still is. That’s all.

‘Loungin’ ft Donald Byrd

Gang Starr’s early work in particular was very much focused on exploring old jazz, both from a sample perspective and the way DJ Premier approached his production ethos. Along with the Native tongues crew they were repsonsible for the re-appreciation of the genre in much the same way the music of three to four years earlier had grinded out the funk licks of James Brown and Amceo Parker. Gugu took the ideology one step further though with a number of high profile cooloborations with high profile jazz musicians on the Jazzmatazz projects.

This record featured trumpeter Donald Byrd, and was endemic of the kind of blissed out mellow brilliance capable when the two genres collided. Guru also took Byrd on tour with another legendary jazz supremo, Roy Ayers. Whether it’s been Nas teaming up with his father or ATCQ showing their love, the combination remains a potent one.

Digable Planets feat. Guru – “Borough Check”

Digable Planets were another crew that dug jazz, and this remains one of Guru’s dopest guest verses. Rhymes and rhymes and rhymes, this is a great smoky hip-hop joint.

‘You Know my steez’

Whilst Guru could do aggression he was best when mellowing it out, and even better when he was doing the former by being the latter. And it doesn’t get much better an example of that than this absolute gem. A hallmark Premier production, the melancholy melody sounding butter over the splurging bass, was met by a lyrical masterclass from Guru.

There’s gems everywhere, from the way “Dropping lyrics that be hotter than sex and candle wax, while one dimensional emcees can’t handle that” shows how to be about one thing yet in style the same minute he dismisses emcees for lacking his intelligence, the whole thing is perfect.

Hip-hop have had few as great in an understated manner.

Noisey breake down Kendrick Lamar ‘Good Kid Maad City’

“He doesn’t normally smoke, but, shit. He’s with the homies”

Kendrick Lamar delivered what the internet, bar Shyne, agreed was a bona fide masterpiece last year in ‘Good Kid MAAD City’, a luscious, fluid tale of life in Compton. Part of the majesty of the record is though that the narrative isn’t particularly clear or consistent, and the chronology is completely at odds with the way the album gels musically. It’s a delicious irony, that something so stylistically coherent is essentially jumbled up. As anyone who’s listened avidly to Ghostafce kill ah make next to no sense on the regular, a lot of the time that’s par the course in hip-hop.

Anyway those folks at Noisey have attempted to break down the stroyline a little more. Clcik the starting quote for the full details. rest assured though that it still makes no sense!

Darren’s thoughts on Thatcher

h5dba8

What can be said about Margaret Thatcher from me that hasn’t already been mentioned on the Television News, Nationwide Radio Stations & major Newspapers of Great Britannia since the announcement of her death on Monday 8th April 2013?

Honesty. None of this ‘no talking bad of the dead‘ traditionalist rubbish let’s get real…

The reason why Margaret Thatcher is rightly hated is that the nation wanted & in some way still require a leader that can make Britain great, and her methods on doing that have divided the nation. The only other Prime Minister since 1945 that can attain similar levels of negativity is…

h5dba8

Tony Blair was Prime Minister from 2nd May 1997 – 27th June 2007, that’s a long time yet for high ranking British Politics it’s more like a hundred years. Some would say his long-lasting legacy was Education, specifically in it’s compulsory phase, yet if this is true shouldn’t it have therefore produced more intelligent and sophisticated young people? You’d think this would be the case yet millions of them find this entertaining…

Also, praising Politicians for improving services for a nation’s Health Service/Education/Public Transport doesn’t work with me as that’s the same as giving merit badges for each Parent that feeds/clothes/houses a Child. This stuff is standard issue requirements. Current British Prime Minister David Cameron is asking for another 4 years in Power because he’s given an exemption to the National Health Service not being part of his austerity cuts, is he for real?!

I believe that Margaret Thatcher was, like her good friend Ronald Reagan, created. This being the correct term used by those figures who are in control yet we never see. It’s possible that each major leader is an actor paid to perform a role for it’s audience:

Evidence:

The British amongst you might view the above video as being somewhat typical of historical antics within The White House yet this little known BBC Documentary shows some uncomfortable truths about Margaret Thatcher.

Evidence:

Would the BBC have the courage to re-show this amazing Documentary showing the honest truth about Margaret Thatcher? The answer is unlikely, mainly because they wouldn’t want to become future victims of David Cameron’s austerity cuts. We have to realize that for all our technology; we occupy a world where Corporations have limitless resources & Journalists report rather than investigate corruption. Now honesty is located in Blogs rather than on TV News.

What proves how out of touch Margaret Thatcher along with each of her successors are, is the following 1985 Report from the American Ambassador to London – Raymond Seitz to his superiors:

Urban Violence in Britain

Reading it, you get the feeling that Ambassador Seitz is in shock that the vast riots happening just four years earlier wasn’t direct enough to get Thatcher’s attention. Particularly the fact that the country included late nineteenth Century levels of actual poverty.

The report was made 28 years ago but worryingly it still has relevance hence the 2011 UK Riots. Life is getting bad when a Politician seems less convincing than a Professional Wrestler, isn’t living in a Democracy about being honest?

Plastic…

Fantastic…

The majority living in Britain feel that life could be better yet it isn’t. Therefore ask yourself this, is our Democracy simply just an illusion? We might as well make CM Punk the new Prime Minster in the next General Election.

I will be celebrating the fact that such a vile individual like Thatcher is dead as these festivities at least show those pulling the strings in the shadows that they haven’t got complete control… yet. As long as freedom of expression doesn’t promote hate & violence then it should be allowed – that’s called True Democracy.

Margaret Thatcher leaves behind two children:

Sir Mark Thatchercurrently banned from entering America, Monaco & Switzerland for being an ‘undesirable’, due to funding an unsuccessful plot involving mercenaries taking over an oil-rich Equatorial Guinea (West Africa) in 2004.

Carol Thatcherdisgraced journalist banned from the BBC for openly expressing racist opinions.

Baroness (she was later given this title) Thatcher was known to be very keen on quoting scripture from The Holy Bible, whilst I am not Christian I found the following that’s suitable…

Matthew 7 : 15-20 [New Kings James Version].


Twitter: @DazAltTheory

Five for the Funk – Big Daddy Kane

BDK

In two weeks time Liverpool is going to get schooled by the don. Big Daddy Kane is coming to town and you better believe it. Alongside the likes of Kool G Rap, Rakim, Slick Rick and Biz Markie, Kane is part of the pantheon of truly great late eighties solo rappers. Everything about him is iconic, from his ultimate braggadocio rhymes to the ridiculousness of his garbs, he had it going on.

Any rapper stunting owes him so much, Biggie’s avuncular arrogance, Kanye’s fashionista flyness, Jay-Z’s smooth swagger – Kane paved the way for all this and much more. In fact Jigga’s debt stretches further, with his early 90s pre rocafella days spent acting as an intermediary hype man for Kane at his shows. His first two albums are absolute classics, and there’s the fact that Rakim, RA FUCKING KIM, cooled the prospect of beef with him. You know when the God thinks twice about entering a battle with you, you’re pretty good.

So in honour of this epochal event, encased in the soon to open East Village Club, five for the funk delivers five bits of greatness from BDK. Large.

‘Smooth Operator’

Mary Jane Girls’ ‘All Night Long’ is one of the most sampled records in hip-hop history, everyone from LL Cool J, Jazzy Jeff and the Fresh Prince, Redman and Ice Cube being among the fifty people in total who have used the saccharine soul 80s classic. I’ve even built a modest dj career off playing it in 90% of my sets of the past five years. But few have done it as well as on Smooth Operator.

While primarily a record in the classic Big Daddy batting off all competitors mould, he does deliver a few bars implying his acumen with the females, but it’s not as much as the title would have you belive. It’s less of a response to the anti-male diatribe of the same name from Sade than you might initially think, particularly as alongside the MJ Girls there’s samples from two of Marvin Gaye’s sexjams (‘Lets get it on’ & ‘Sexual healing’). Instead it’s just Kane doing what he does best, holding court like the don he is.

‘Raw’

This is the ronseal of 80s hip-hop. Marley Marl’s splicing of James Brown and Bobby Byrd just about manages to avoid being dated and Kane just goes, as you’d expect, raw. He’s an absolute animal on the mic in this, just a relentless barrage of skill that is the calling card of one of the greatest. An absolute monument of the genre.

‘Don’t Curse’ (Heavy D ft Kool G Rap, Pete Rock, Cl Smooth, Grand Puba, Q-Tip & Big Daddy Kane)

As posse cuts go this is up there with the best of them. The roll call features people who earned their stripes repping verse after verse in the Juice Crew, Tribe Called Quest and Grand Nubian, all coming together to show that they don’t need to swear to keep it going. It was of course an answer to the proliferation of Parental Advisory stickers which were rampant in hip-hop in time. It’s not the greatest 8 bars from Kane in his career, but he’s still smooth as ever and the track and video are amazing. Heavy D also looks ridiculous in prison style pyjamas, what’s not to love about that?

‘Any type of Way’

What marks Kane out from some of his peers is how graciously he’s aged. No rapper can ever maintain a scintillating appeal, but some slip from world domination to head in hands moments quicker than most. I’m looking at you KRS and Rakim. Kane however, has gone down the Slick Rick route of touring off the back of a legendary status and the odd track since his heyday and this gem from 2003, produced by DJ Premier, proves his mettle.

He’s still nice on the mic but rather than being on that arrogant tip here he is slipping into the paternal figure of hip-hop a man of his status should do. And his voice fits Preemo’s as ever on point production perfectly. The two recently joined up again for a nike commercial with the brilliant 28 bars, which features the genius closing gambit “I went on 28 just to raise the bars”. Don’t doubt this an emcee still with it.

‘Ain’t no Half-Steppin’

Still the one. This is just a relentless surge of look at me I am boss; put-downs, big me-ups, the lot. From a lyrical point of view it’s hard to think of many songs that deliver an aura of greatness quite like this, and the calling card ‘I’m awesome’ records of rappers, be them Biggie’s ‘Unbelievable’, Jay-Z’s ‘So Ghetto’, Big L’s ‘Flamboyant’ and so on, all stand behind this. Everyone is a butter knife compared to Kane’s machete faced with this.

The video is gloriously lo-fi, a reminder of the lack of real money in hi-hop at the time, when you get the impression that the combined cost of the tracksuits worn by Kane and his dancers probably outweighs the overall budget. That’s not to say he isn’t looking hella fresh, with a chain that probably cost the GNP of an eastern European country and a general persona that is dripping swag. The iconic BDK tune.

For ticket info hit here.

Jay-Z kicks off – Open letter

All he did was go on holiday. Hopping to cuba got a few people annoyed with Jigga so he did what anyone would do, wrote a retaliatory record. Special mention to the use of the word dweeb. Big up Hov for that.

Five for the Funk – Party like it’s 1999

Five for the funk returns after a fortnight hiatus (bloggers have bank holidays too). And this time it’s all about one apocalyptic year. Nineteen. Ninety. Nine.

Remember the millennium bug? It had one hell of an impact on hip-hop, everything from Def Jam 2000 to the obsession with the impending apocalypse that the likes of Method Man and Busta Rhymes rapped frequently about cropped up. Will Smith used the year to go from playful pop to out and out wack with a helping hand from KCI and Jojo, and Puff Daddy reacted to the Lox destroying his street appeal by getting Buckwild of DITC to produce the greatest underground joint Bad Boy ever put out without Biggie behind it.

Most importantly though, 1999 was the year hip-hop got good again. Really good. Slick Rick did what the likes of KRS-one and Rakim had been incapable of in recent years, return with a scintillating degree of relevancy, the dirty south started to get really hot with the help of Mannie Fresh and an upstart from Detroit proved being melatonin deficient wasn’t a guarantee of being poor. That rapper in question, a certain Eminem, also brought with him maybe the most important development in hip-hop’s post millenium popscape… the return to prominence of Dr Dre. But most of all the music was just fantastic.

I recently linked to the Czarface album as they heralded the year as a golden age for hip-hop and whilst there’s better points historically for sure, this definitely stands up as one of the finest 12 months the genre has ever seen. Here’s five of the choicest cuts from that time period, and apologies in advance for the andre heaviness.

Slick Rick ft Big Boi ‘Street Talkin’

Few rappers go onto live up to their earlier work a decade afterwards. Nas did so last year with ‘Life is Good’, his second best album after Illmatic, but 1999 was a time when two of the biggest forces in late eighties rap appeared from the doldrums to capture the critical consensus once more. The first was golden age icon Slick Rick, who’s ‘Adventures of Storytelling‘ is an absolute classic. Peppered with star turns from big hitters of the time such as Nas, Raekwon and Canibus, it brought his sinister sense of humour back to the forefront alongside that butter flow. One of the standout tunes was Big Boi returning the star turn Ricky gave on the remix of Outkast’s song of the same title, with the glorious Street Talkin. So, so good.

Ghostface Killah ft U-God & Goldie ‘Cherchez la Ghost’

From 1993-1997 Wu Tang were flawless. Raekwon, GZA and Ghostface delivered classic debuts, whilst Method Man and ODB managed to put forward compelling visions of their personality which if not classic were still very good, not to mention a litany of guest appearances across albums from 2Pac, Mobb Deep and Biggie. Of that five only one managed to deliver on their sophomore, in fact he went better on it. Ghostface.

Supreme Clientele is the greatest non debut Wu solo album ever, no question, and I’d probably say it was the best solo joint full stop. RZA tearing through awesome beats, Ghostface’s patented gibberish and this record, an example of how to go R&B and stay grimy. U-God putting a ruff rider on his dick and busting right through them vying for Tony Starks and that dressing gown for the finest jaw dropping moment in the three minutes of bliss, as the Wu shows Bad Boy how to take an obvious disco sample and keep it street. Jiggy Y2K style.

Eminem ‘Guilty Conscience’

Slick Rick was the hot rapper from the 80s to come full circle, but undeniably Dre was the producer. Part of the story of how he clambered back to the forefront comes in lieu of this record…

Slim Shady had caught the attention of the underground with a runners up slot at the rap Olympics, a slew of underground bangers with Rawkus and the catchy ‘Just Don’t give a Fuck‘, but he really blew up with what seemed like a novelty single in the shape of ‘My Name is’ in early 1999. Dre produced it and has since said the plan was to make it as annoying as possible to ensure the word was out and follow it up with Eminem showing his true class. It was a tactical masterclass Jose Mourinho would be proud of and this record, the two of them sparring together on record, was the first of a series of relentless OMG moments from Slim.

The good/evil combination isn’t exactly original but the way it’s played out certainly is, Dre suddenly being reinvented as a paternal figure and then Eminem exposing the hypocrisy of ‘Mr NWA/Mr AK’ dishing out advice. If it had been a diss record it would of been a milestone, but for it to be something that he convinced Dre to do (and almost certainly ghost-wrote the lyrics that he responded with) it shows so much about the level of trust and respect Dre had gifted his protege at such an early stage, and the start of a glorious two years of shared creativity. It also shows as much as Em was a savagely humorous extortionist of questionable subject matter, he also utilised balance in his yarns, even if through the voice of overs. This would reach it’s staggering apex with Stan – incidentally introduced to the Slim Shady entertainment world in the second verse.

That subject matter was as disgusting as Eminem would become known for, advocating under-age rape, armed robbery and murder (even if done with delicious humour – the way he berates Dre’s explanation with ‘slipped, tripped, fell, landed on his dick’ a prime example), but at the time it was ridiculously exciting, unquestionably. Music fans very rarely get to live through super-stardom in real time (the percentage of Beatles fans on the planet around at their peak must be minuscule) but Eminem’s finest three years I lived through every step of the way and watched how the music only a few people in my school liked suddenly became omnipresent.

Snoop Dogg ft Nate Dogg and Xzibit ‘Bitch Please’

The Doctor again. Dre was ‘back’ through working with Eminem but he was doing so through the medium of a white trailer trash kid from Detroit and with a poppier focus; the next dawning of g-funk wasn’t hinted at yet. 1998 saw a blistering Dre production creep under the radar with the shape of old sparring partner Kurrupt on ‘Ask yourself a question‘ but one record snapped into focus and threw up the dubs. When ‘Bitch Please’ appeared on Snoop’s ‘No Limit Top Dogg‘ as one of three Dre productions, you knew this shit was back on.

Everything about this joint is perfect. When the beat kicks in with the drums and the low end rumbling it was seismic, I remember hearing this for the first time better than most milestones in my life. Xzibit, at that point an underground emcee with plenty of heat and no dodgy MTV show, drops the verse of his life which is littered with quotables, referencing his likwit connections, slick rick and Canibus in 24 breathless bars. He would go on to tread water for the majority of the rest of his career, but this was the reason why.

It was also the point where Snoop realised his future career, hot singles where the focus was on how he sounded over a ridiculous beat. His delivery here is this out there hybrid of crooner, pillow talk and street slang, completely alien to anything else and tailor made for the Dre sonics. And if that wasn’t enough Nate Dogg decides to turn up at the end and say ‘hey oh’ in the most amazing fashion. All four protagonists deliver resoundingly for what is a beyond brilliant masterpiece.

Pharoah Monche ‘Simon Says’

That riff. Those drums. The four note sample from Godzilla was inspired, and Pharaoh drifting brilliantly between his usual cerebral self and straight up club thug stance made the whole thing so much more accomplished. The added whut-whuts on the chorus deliver a broad chested swagger (that’s already evident in spades) and the lyrics flip between self-deprecating humour (“you sold platinum round the world, I sold wood in the hood”) and the clever way both verses end with 2if you holding up the wall then you missing the point” meant an emcee known for technical genius could dumb down with the best of them whilst still having that lyrical subtlety. This is a cat remember that no less an authority than The Alchemist cites as the greatest of all time.

The impact of the record was so much certain commentators even labelled it as the beginning of the end for Rawkus who suddenly saw a product rather than an artform, which is a delicious irony considering the impact it has when it sounds. It’s just brasher and louder than everything else going, M1 & Stic-Man aside. Big and clever? Only in the hands of the Pharoah. An anthem of epic proportions.

B.I.G. Over Premier – DJ Premier And The Notorious B.I.G. Mix By DJ Finesse NYC

This is beyond mega. Preemo instrumentals with Biggie acapellas over the top, cut and spliced together with the right amount of deck technique. There’s nothing worse than a DJ thinjking his skills are more important than the music being played and Finesse lets Biggie’s bragging and Preemo’s pounding do the talking here. The result is astonishing.

Personal highlights include the laconic bounce of ‘Going Back to Cali’ riding deep over arguably Premier’s finest hour, the beat for CNN ‘Invincible’, and the feel-good genius of both Juicy and Nas is Like combining. And then he sacks it all off to let ‘Unbelievable’ sign things off. A fitting tribute to awesome talents.

Grab your dick if you love hip-hop.

DJ Finesse “B.I.G. Over Premier” Mixtape Tracklist:

1. DJ Premier Intro
2. Flava In Ya Ear rmx over I Gave You Power 

3. Big Poppa over Ex To Next Girl 

4. Dead Wrong over 2 Thousand 

5. 10 Crack Commandments over One Day 

6. Who Shot Ya over Come Clean 

7. All About The Benjamins over Supa Dupa Star (1994 Demo Version)
8. One More Chance over Recognize 

9. Long Kiss Goodnight over You Know My Steez 

10. Things Done Changed over The Format 

11. I Got A Story To Tell over Shit Is Real 

12. Real Niggas over Ready 

13. Juicy over Nas Is Like 

14. One More Chance rmx over Freaky Flow 

15. Warning (Freestyle) over Mind Ya Business 

16. ’95 Freestyle (7 Mac 11′s) over Who Got Gunz 

17. Victory over Project Boy 

18. Kick In The Door over Come Get Me 

19. Going Back To Cali over The Invincible 

20. Mo Money Mo Problems over Golden Child 

21. Party And Bullshit over Now Your Mine 

22. Unbelievable

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